Olink

Olink®
Part of Thermo Fisher Scientific

Cardiometabolic_II

Gene
ARNTL

Uniprot
O00327

Protein
Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein 1

See alternative names Brain and muscle ARNT-like 1,
Member of PAS protein 3,
Basic-helix-loop-helix-PAS protein MOP3,
Class E basic helix-loop-helix protein 5,
bHLH-PAS protein JAP3,
PAS domain-containing protein 3

Uniprot Function Description

Transcriptional activator which forms a core component of the circadian clock. The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, regulates various physiological processes through the generation of approximately 24 hour circadian rhythms in gene expression, which are translated into rhythms in metabolism and behavior. It is derived from the Latin roots 'circa' (about) and 'diem' (day) and acts as an important regulator of a wide array of physiological functions including metabolism, sleep, body temperature, blood pressure, endocrine, immune, cardiovascular, and renal function. Consists of two major components: the central clock, residing in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain, and the peripheral clocks that are present in nearly every tissue and organ system. Both the central and peripheral clocks can be reset by environmental cues, also known as Zeitgebers (German for 'timegivers'). The predominant Zeitgeber for the central clock is light, which is sensed by retina and signals directly to the SCN. The central clock entrains the peripheral clocks through neuronal and hormonal signals, body temperature and feeding-related cues, aligning all clocks with the external light/dark cycle. Circadian rhythms allow an organism to achieve temporal homeostasis with its environment at the molecular level by regulating gene expression to create a peak of protein expression once every 24 hours to control when a particular physiological process is most active with respect to the solar day. Transcription and translation of core clock components (CLOCK, NPAS2, ARNTL/BMAL1, ARNTL2/BMAL2, PER1, PER2, PER3, CRY1 and CRY2) plays a critical role in rhythm generation, whereas delays imposed by post-translational modifications (PTMs) are important for determining the period (tau) of the rhythms (tau refers to the period of a rhythm and is the length, in time, of one complete cycle). A diurnal rhythm is synchronized with the day/night cycle, while the ultradian and infradian rhythms have a period shorter and longer than 24 hours, respectively. Disruptions in the circadian rhythms contribute to the pathology of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, metabolic syndromes and aging. A transcription/translation feedback loop (TTFL) forms the core of the molecular circadian clock mechanism. Transcription factors, CLOCK or NPAS2 and ARNTL/BMAL1 or ARNTL2/BMAL2, form the positive limb of the feedback loop, act in the form of a heterodimer and activate the transcription of core clock genes and clock-controlled genes (involved in key metabolic processes), harboring E-box elements (5'-CACGTG-3') within their promoters. The core clock genes: PER1/2/3 and CRY1/2 which are transcriptional repressors form the negative limb of the feedback loop and interact with the CLOCK|NPAS2-ARNTL/BMAL1|ARNTL2/BMAL2 heterodimer inhibiting its activity and thereby negatively regulating their own expression. This heterodimer also activates nuclear receptors NR1D1/2 and RORA/B/G, which form a second feedback loop and which activate and repress ARNTL/BMAL1 transcription, respectively. ARNTL/BMAL1 positively regulates myogenesis and negatively regulates adipogenesis via the transcriptional control of the genes of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Plays a role in normal pancreatic beta-cell function; regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via the regulation of antioxidant genes NFE2L2/NRF2 and its targets SESN2, PRDX3, CCLC and CCLM. Negatively regulates the mTORC1 signaling pathway; regulates the expression of MTOR and DEPTOR. Controls diurnal oscillations of Ly6C inflammatory monocytes; rhythmic recruitment of the PRC2 complex imparts diurnal variation to chemokine expression that is necessary to sustain Ly6C monocyte rhythms. Regulates the expression of HSD3B2, STAR, PTGS2, CYP11A1, CYP19A1 and LHCGR in the ovary and also the genes involved in hair growth. Plays an important role in adult hippocampal neurogenesis by regulating the timely entry of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) into the cell cycle and the number of cell divisions that take place prior to cell-cycle exit. Regulates the circadian expression of CIART and KLF11. The CLOCK-ARNTL/BMAL1 heterodimer regulates the circadian expression of SERPINE1/PAI1, VWF, B3, CCRN4L/NOC, NAMPT, DBP, MYOD1, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, SIRT1, GYS2, F7, NGFR, GNRHR, BHLHE40/DEC1, ATF4, MTA1, KLF10 and also genes implicated in glucose and lipid metabolism. Promotes rhythmic chromatin opening, regulating the DNA accessibility of other transcription factors. The NPAS2-ARNTL/BMAL1 heterodimer positively regulates the expression of MAOA, F7 and LDHA and modulates the circadian rhythm of daytime contrast sensitivity by regulating the rhythmic expression of adenylate cyclase type 1 (ADCY1) in the retina. The preferred binding motif for the CLOCK-ARNTL/BMAL1 heterodimer is 5'-CACGTGA-3', which contains a flanking Ala residue in addition to the canonical 6-nucleotide E-box sequence (PubMed:23229515). CLOCK specifically binds to the half-site 5'-CAC-3', while ARNTL binds to the half-site 5'-GTGA-3' (PubMed:23229515). The CLOCK-ARNTL/BMAL1 heterodimer also recognizes the non-canonical E-box motifs 5'-AACGTGA-3' and 5'-CATGTGA-3' (PubMed:23229515). Essential for the rhythmic interaction of CLOCK with ASS1 and plays a critical role in positively regulating CLOCK-mediated acetylation of ASS1 (PubMed:28985504). Plays a role in protecting against lethal sepsis by limiting the expression of immune checkpoint protein CD274 in macrophages in a PKM2-dependent manner (By similarity). Regulates the diurnal rhythms of skeletal muscle metabolism via transcriptional activation of genes promoting triglyceride synthesis (DGAT2) and metabolic efficiency (COQ10B) (By similarity).

Sample type

Human EDTA plasma and serum are the recommended sample types. Human citrate plasma and heparin plasma are also accepted. For other samples types e.g cerebrospinal fluid, (CSF), tissue or cell lysates please we recommend Olink Target 96 panels. Please note that protein expression levels are expected to vary in different sample types and certain assays may be affected by interfering substances such as hemolysate.

Analytical measuring range

The technical data reported below refers to the measured value in the in vitro validation assays run using known concentrations of recombinant antigen. Please note that these figures are for reference only and CANNOT be used to convert NPX values to absolute concentrations for proteins measured in plasma or serum samples.

LOD (pg/mL)
3125
LLOQ (pg/mL)
6250
ULOQ (pg/mL)
400000
Hook (pg/mL)
800000
Range (logs)
1.8

Dilution factor

For optimal assay readout, Olink Explore is run using different dilutions of the original samples (undiluted, 1:10, 1:100 or 1:1000). The dilution factor for this assay is noted below and should be taken into account when estimating the appropriate addressable biological concentration of the protein based on the in vitro validation data.

Dilution factor
1:1

Sensitivity plot

The calibrator curve shown below visualizes the analytical measuring range data based on in vitro measurement of recombinant antigen. Please note that this is shown for reference only and CANNOT be used to convert NPX values to absolute concentrations for proteins measured in plasma or serum samples. The vertical dotted lines represent LLOQ and ULOQ respectively, and the horizontal line indicates the LOD.

10⁻⁶10⁻⁴10⁻²10⁰10²10⁴10⁶10⁸181614121086420−2pg/mLNPXReplicate4PLLODLLOQULOQ

Sample distribution plot

The plot below shows the levels of protein measured in a number of commercial plasma samples. Healthy subjects are shown in blue and samples obtained from patients with a range of diseases are shown in red. The latter include inflammatory, cardiovascular, autoimmune & neurological diseases, as well as cancer. The data is shown to give a general idea of the sort of data range to expect, but cannot cover all potential levels that may be seen in clinical samples.

181614121086420−2NPXControl SamplesDisease Samples